Biometric Payment Kiosks Being Used in America

Biometrics are becoming increasingly important in our lives. Many of us use our fingerprints every day to access our phones, tablets and laptops. Now, biometric payment kiosks are also beginning to arrive. So could paying with a physical credit card or cash soon become a thing of the past?

 

New York Mets Introduce New Biometric Kiosks

 

The New York Mets have recently brought in new biometric payment kiosks at the City Field stadium. These biometric self-checkouts mean that fans will be able to buy their food and drinks using their fingers instead of using cards or cash.

 

The provider of food and drink at Citi Field, Aramark, has teamed up with a biometrics firm, Clear, to introduce the technology. Biometrics have been included in the self-checkout machines from Mashgin, as reported here.

 

The kiosks use artificial intelligence to scan multiple items at the same time, saving even more time for customers.

 

Frictionless Purchasing

 

The new kiosks combine two technologies so that Aramark, the concessionaire, can provide the most frictionless service to customers with a fully automated system.

 

Mashgin provides the AI-powered kiosks and Clear provides the biometric platform. Fans simply choose their items, place them on the unit, then place their fingers on the reader to be scanned. Clear then uses the credit card they have on file to charge the customer.

 

Fans may also want to purchase alcohol. When they do so, the system verifies that they are old enough to drink before they are able to complete the purchase.

 

Other Sports Clubs Using Biometrics

 

Clear has also been getting involved with other sports clubs. It launched its biometric concessions system at CenturyLink Field and at T-Mobile Park in Seattle, Washington. This was the first time that biometrics were used to replace ID and a credit card

 

And it also started working with the Mets earlier in the year on another system, piloting a screening service. Using this system, fans can enter the ballpark using their faces as their ticket, as reported here.

 

Back in April, Clear introduced a biometric ticketing system that allows fans to link their tickets to their fingerprints. When they arrive, they just tap and walk through without any need to scan a ticket.

 

Biometric Payment Kiosks Provide Benefits for Fans

 

There are many benefits with the new biometric systems. For a start, there is less queueing involved because it’s quicker for customers to purchase their food and drink. This means it’s easier for fans to get what they want and get back to the game so they can spend more time watching the action.

 

Could biometric payment kiosks catch on? If it works, it’s very likely. Businesses are constantly looking for ways to make the purchasing process quicker and easier, and this is one way they can achieve this.

 

There are likely to be some questions about privacy. But on the other hand, people are getting increasingly used to using their fingerprints on their phones and when they travel through airports. If it makes the purchasing experience quicker and easier, it’s likely to become more popular over the coming years.